Tag Archives: legislation

How Much Of A Cosmetic Product Do You Use?

How Much Cosmetic Product Do You Use

I don’t suppose many people stop to think about how much shampoo or body lotion they are using.  I know I don’t.  But it is something that some people need to worry about.  When cosmetic products are assessed for their safety the amount that is used is a relevant parameter.  Obviously you use a lot more body lotion than face cream for example.  So you need to take this into account.  Continue reading

REACH and Animal Testing

REACH and Animal Testing

The most recent version of the cosmetic regulations, which came into force in the summer of 2013, made it illegal to test on animals for the purposes of developing cosmetics. This is something that has pleased most people, who tend to think of cosmetics as not really being worth being cruel to animals for.  It doesn’t bother cosmetic chemists for whom the tests have never really been any help anyway. The only stumbling block has been the people responsible for consumer safety for whom the use of animals to test for toxicity was a useful form of reassurance. Continue reading

Cosmetic Safety Assessments

cosmetic safety assessmentsSince the nineties the European Union’s cosmetic legislation has required that all cosmetic and personal care products placed on the market should be assessed for safety by a suitably qualified person.  I am not sure what the exact thinking behind this was. As cosmetics had not been particularly unsafe before that, the intention must have been simply to reassure consumers.  But as almost nobody outside the industry knows about the existence of these assessments, I have a feeling that the general public has not been particularly reassured.  Given how much work and effort goes into them this really is a bit of a shame.   So I thought I’d do a blog post to help spread this knowledge a little. Continue reading

Pigments In Paintings And Cosmetics

national gallery

I was glad I made the time last summer to visit the National Gallery’s exhibition of the pigments artists have used over the years.  It was a fascinating business, and it is a bit sobering to remember just how much work the great masters of painting had to do before they even got to the stage of getting to the actual painting.  As a cosmetic scientist it was also interesting to see just how much overlap there was between what artists and cosmeticians used, and indeed still do.  It was also interesting to note that changes in the availability of raw materials and the technology for processing them have had a big influence on what could be done, another common thread that applies to both art and cosmetics. Continue reading

Bomb Cosmetics Chocolate Ballotin Assortment

Bath bombs have come a long way.  The chemistry behind them is simple enough. Citric acid and sodium bicarbonate react together to release carbon dioxide which makes it fizz when you add them to a bath. A simple if unsophisticated pleasure.  I don’t know who first thought of the idea but I first became aware of them back in the eighties.  They were a craft thing mainly then, turning up at village fêtes and the like.  They are still a mainstay of the people who like making their own fun – and very imaginative a lot of them are. Continue reading

Microbeads In Cosmetics

microbeadsAs a keen environmentalist I often find myself face palming when a cosmetic company picks up on a green issue.  They often home in on things that aren’t particularly relevant and propose solutions that are questionable.  But I think the recent interest in the risks posed by microbeads is one where there is a real problem. Continue reading

The EU’s Categories of Cosmetic Products

EU Cosmetic Product Categories

Have you ever wondered what exactly a cosmetic is?  Most people don’t give it a second thought.  And why should they?  But the people who drafted the EU’s Cosmetic Regulations  had to be a bit more systematic and before they started coming up with the regulations they drew up a list of the thirty categories of cosmetic product which they covered.  Being a bit of an imp I instantly tried to think of any they had left out.  I couldn’t, but I wondered if any of the shiny, happy and reproductively successful people who read this blog could think of any.

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MI in Paint

MI in paint

One of the most surprising things about blogging is how much you learn.  A good example arrived in my inbox yesterday.  I have just started a newsletter for people with sensitive skin, largely because I get a lot of people getting in touch looking for information about it, and in particular sensitivity to methylisothiazolinone or MI.  This is of course of no interest at all to the 99.9% people who don’t have a problem with it, so I thought a newsletter was a good way of giving them the information they want without devoting too many blog posts to it.  But a list member drew my attention to something simply too interesting not to share it. Continue reading

Latest News on MI

methylisothiazolinone

I get a lot of traffic to this blog from people interested in methylisothiazolinone, or as it is now known MI.   For people who haven’t been following the story, here’s a quick recap.  MI has been used for about 40 years in combination with a closely related chemical called methylchloroisothiazolinone.  I’ll call that MCI.   The combination works extremely well at very low levels.  Its Achilles Heel is that it causes a lot of allergic reactions when used at higher levels.  This took formulators a while to work out when it was first introduced.  But the level was scaled down and the reactions went down.  Continue reading